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Christian Scholars' Conference 2011

Call for Papers

At the academic heart of the Christian Scholars' Conference are its peer reviewed sessions. The following calls for papers are posted by peer reviewed leaders. Submitted abstracts or papers will be read anonymously and evaluated by scholars selected by the peer reviewed leader and approved by the CSC director.

Updated February 26, 2010.

 

SCIENCE FICTION AND BIOETHICS

Science fiction films have been a vital arena for exploring issues of bioethics. From the recently restored Metropolis to A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, sci fi has envisioned a mechanized world where humanity competes with machines. The Stepford Wives, Brazil, and Gattaca anticipated the extremes of body modification we now accept as commonplace. Cinematic adaptations of the work of Philip K. Dick like Blade Runner and Minority Report became timely cautionary tales. Even Jurassic Park suggests that when humans play God, dangerous events follow.

Have you done research on films exploring bioethics? It may complement the upcoming Christian Scholars' Conference, "Science, Theology, and The Academy" at Pepperdine University, June 16-18, 2011.

Please submit a 300-500 word proposal that provides the thesis, general lines of argument, and method for the paper in a Word.doc attachment to craig.detweiler@pepperdine.edu by March 1, 2011.

Notification will follow by March 15, 2011

EVOLUTION AND THEOLOGY

"Evolution may obviate the need for a supreme being or be seen as so elegant as to have something of the divine about it. What is important is not that people find evolution utterly comforting or discomforting, but that the complexities are recognized and dealt with." (Brem, et al, 2003, Science Education. 87: 181-206). Evangelicals often see evolutionary science as having a negative impact on how they view human behavior, spirituality, and purpose. Christian thought offers a richer account - provided we read the biblical narratives theologically and as theological accounts though written with a pre-scientific worldview. Papers dealing with the following are requested: Anthropology and Original Sin; Neuroscience and the Soul; Behavioral Epigenetics and Pastoral Care; Biological Altruism and Jesus' Incommensurable Love Command; Evolution and Divine Action/Purpose/Providence; Evolution and Theodicy.

Submit an abstract of 85-100 words and a precís of 1500-3000 words in a Word attachment via e-mail by 21 December, 2010 to: Daniel K. Brannan, .

Notice of acceptance of your paper will be provided by 18 January, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

NARRATIVE AND SYNCHRONIC READINGS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT

The Narrative and Synchronic Readings of the Old Testament peer review session offers the opportunity to present interpretations of an Old Testament text or texts through various narrative and synchronic methodologies. The goal is to engage and find meaning in the text in its canonical form. In light of the theme of this year's conference, papers on Genesis 1-11 are especially encouraged, but papers on any OT text(s) are welcome. This session invites submissions from both working scholars and graduate students. Those outside the theological disciplines are invited to submit paper proposals as well.

Please submit a 300-500 word proposal that provides the thesis, general lines of argument, and method for the paper via e-mail attachment by January 15, 2011 to: Phillip Camp at .

Notice of acceptance of your paper will be provided by February 15, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

THE PATH OF DISCOVERY FOR CHILDREN: HELPING CHILDREN INTEGRATE SCIENCE AND FAITH

Continuing the conversation about children and theology at the CSC, we invite papers that explore topics at the intersection of science, theology, and children's issues. Presentations may pursue some aspect of the following questions: What catechetical approaches ought the church use for assisting children in constructing a coherent worldview engaging both science and theology? What are the roles of the various catechists engaged in such a process? How do faith and science help children understand our world in terms of ontology, epistemology, anthropology, ecotheology, and teleology?

For consideration by a peer-review committee, please submit a 350 word abstract to Ron Bruner at wbhdir@aol.com no later than December 21, 2010.

Participants will be notified by January 18, 2011 of the status of their submission. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

CRIME FICTION, SCIENCE, AND THE BATTLE BETWEEN GOOD AND EVIL

A universal theme inJudeo-Christian literature is the battle between good and evil. This theme plays out in many genres - from Milton's epic poetry to Tolkien's fantasy novels, to Wilkie Collins' Moonstone, a novel described by T. S. Eliot as "the first and greatest of English detective novels." As Knutson notes, "The first practitioners within crime writing prepared the genre for a conservative worldview [in which] there was a binary opposition between right and wrong, good and evil," and for the popular subgenre of forensic crime drama, the dichotomy still holds true. However, science has replaced God as the "good" and religion is often linked to evil (bigotry, intolerance, insanity) in the epic battle between good and evil. Submissions are welcome on any aspect of the role of science and/or religion in th battle between good and evil in crime fiction. This session invites submissions from both working scholars and PhD students.

Abstracts of 100 to 150 words and a brief bio should be sent in a Word attachment via e-mail by 21 December, 2010 to Stephanie M. Eddleman, szeddleman@harding.edu.

Notice of acceptance of your paper will be provided by January 18, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

MUSIC and/in SCIENCE

Music's relationship to the sciences is both elemental and evolutionary: from the medieval quadrivium to Kepler's "music of the spheres" to the stochastic music of Iannis Xenakis. The relationship is also exploited throughout opera history in works such as Il Mondo della Luna, Der Freischütz, Faust and Mefistofele, The Makropoulos Case and Dr. Atomic, often with a last-minute turn to a metaphysical redemption accompanied by appropriately ecclesiastic music. Submissions are welcome on any aspect of the role music plays in exemplifying scientific practice or intersecting with scientific thought.

Abstracts of 100 to 150 words and a brief bio should be sent in a Word attachment via e-mail by December 21, 2010 to Gregory Straughn (gregory.straughn@acu.edu).

Notice of acceptance will be provided by January 18, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

THE USE OF JEWISH LITERATURE IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY

This peer reviewed session will examine the incorporation, interpretation, and adaptation of the First Testament and “intertestamental” literature by Christians in the first three centuries of the Common Era. The topic is broadly conceived in order to appeal to a wide spectrum of biblical and patristic disciplines and methodologies. For example, submissions could focus on a specific early Christian author (The Exodus in Johannine Literature), a particular ancient Jewish text (Jude’s Use of 1 Enoch), typology (Jesus as the Prophet Like Moses), theology (Creation Language in Christian Baptismal Teaching), redaction criticism (Alterations to LXX Citations in Hebrews), ancient exegetical methods (The Thirteen Rules of Rabbi Ishmael and Papias’ Interpretation of the Blessing of Judah), and narrative criticism (Prophets Like Elijah as Characters in Luke-Acts), just to name a few.

This session invites submissions from both working scholars and graduate students. Please submit a 300-500 word proposal that provides the thesis, general lines of argument, and method for the paper via e-mail attachment by December 21, 2011 to curt.niccum@acu.edu. Graduate students may also be required to submit a near-final paper by January 15, 2011.

Notice of acceptance of your paper will be provided by February 15, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

WALKER PERCY: SCIENCE AND LITERATURE

Twentieth-century writer Walker Percy studied to be a physician and became a novelist. Much of his fiction aims to confront “scientism,” a belief that only science provides knowledge about the universe. He worries that people are unable to recognize the limits of scientific knowledge, and thus, they depend on it even to define the self. This session requests papers that explore Percy’s dialogue with science, either in his novels or in his published essays.

Please submit and abstract of 250-500 words in a Word.doc attachment via email to Dr. Jessica Hooten at jhooten@umhb.edu by February 15, 2011.

Notice of acceptance of your paper will be provided by March 1, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

STONE CAMPBELL HISTORY

The Stone-Campbell Movement history session has an open call for history and historical theology papers that deal with people, ideas, events, and institutions in the movement. For more than two hundred years the SCM has significantly influenced Christianity and culture. Particularly, SCM individuals and groups have juxtaposed science and theology in various ways for diverse purposes. Although all submissions dealing with the movement’s history and development of thought will be considered, papers that deal historically with interactions between science and theology are of special interest. 

For consideration by a peer-review committee, please submit a 500-800 word proposal to James Gorman, jamey_gorman@baylor.edu, no later than February 15, 2010. Paper proposals should include title, primary sources utilized, the main arguments of the presentation, and a brief bio of the author.

Notice of the status of your submission will be provided by March 1, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

NEW TESTAMENT SECTION

The New Testament Section issues an open call for studies that deal with questions or issues pertaining to discrete texts. Papers may focus on any NT passage and will be judged on originality, clarity, and exegetical rigor. Graduate students are invited to submit complete papers of approximately 8-10 pages, double-spaced. Faculty members may submit proposals of 300-400 words describing the aim and scope of their papers.

All proposals will be considered by a peer-review committee, which will organize one or two sessions, depending on the number and quality of proposals received. Please send proposals to Christopher R. Hutson (crhutson@acu.edu) no later than February 11, 2011. Paper proposals should include the title of the paper and a brief bio of the author, which will appear in the CSC program, if the paper is accepted.

We will notify you of the status of your submission by March 1, 2011. This Call for Papers is now Closed.

 


CALL FOR PLAYS FOR 2012 CSC

Christian Scholars' Conference

Playwriting Competition

The Christian Scholars' Conference announces its first playwriting competition and seeks short and full length plays based on the theme of Reconciliation for the 2012 Conference in Nashville, TN.

Playwrights may submit the following plays:

1) 10-15 Minute short play

2) Full length play

Plays must deal with the theme of reconciliation.

Short Play Winners

There will be three finalists chosen in the short play category. Each finalist will have a staged reading of his or her play presented during the 2012 conference and will be a part of a talk back afterward to discuss their play with CSC audience.

Full Length Winner

There will be one full-length play winner and his or her work will be produced by the Lipscomb Theatre Department for the 2012 Conference. The winner will have opportunity to develop his or her play throughout the year leading up to its performance. The playwright will then be in attendance on opening night and take part in a talk back after the show with conference attendees.

Deadline

A panel of judges will read submissions and choose finalists before the 2011 conference. Selections will be announced during the 2011 conference at Pepperdine. The deadline for play submission is April 1, 2011 to: Mike Fernandez at mike.fernandez@lipscomb.edu.