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Pepperdine University

Core Competencies

Oral Communication

Outcome

Students will demonstrate oral communication that is organized, clear, consistently observable, skillful and makes the content of the presentation cohesive.

Dimensions

  • Students will demonstrate communication that has an organizational pattern (specific introduction and conclusion, sequenced material within the body, and transitions), is clear and consistently observable and is skillful and makes the content of the presentation cohesive.
  • Students oral communication will include language choices that are imaginative, memorable, compelling, enhance the effectiveness of the presentation and are appropriate to audience.
  • Students will demonstrate delivery techniques (posture, gesture, eye contact, and vocal expressiveness) that make the presentation compelling and will appear polished and confident.
  • Supporting materials (explanations, examples, illustrations, statistics, analogies, quotations from relevant authorities) will make appropriate reference to information or analysis that significantly supports the presentation or establishes the presenter's credibility/authority on the topic.
  • Students will demonstrate in an oral communication presentation a central message that is compelling (precisely stated, appropriately repeated, memorable, and strongly supported).

Critical Thinking

Outcome

Students will be able to think critically and creatively, communicate clearly, and act with integrity.

Dimensions

  • Issue/problem to be considered critically is stated clearly and described comprehensively, delivering all relevant information necessary for full understanding.
  • Information is taken from source(s) with enough interpretation/evaluation to develop a comprehensive analysis or synthesis. Viewpoints of experts are questioned thoroughly.
  • Thoroughly (systematically and methodically) analyzes own and others' assumptions and carefully evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position.
  • Specific position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) is imaginative, taking into account the complexities of an issue. Limits of position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) are acknowledged. Others' points of view are synthesized within position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis).
  • Conclusions and related outcomes (consequences and implications) are logical and reflect student's informed evaluation and ability to place evidence and perspectives discussed in priority order.

Information Literacy

Outcome

Students will be able to evaluate significant and authoritative resources and integrates these sources within the context of the research project.

Dimensions

  • The student defines the research question or thesis and determines key concepts. The types of information (sources) selected relate to concepts or answer the research question.
  • The student accesses information using search strategies and information sources.
  • The student analyzes own and others' assumptions and evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position.
  • The student communicates, organizes and synthesizes information from sources to achieve a specific, intended purpose. 
  • The student uses all of the information use strategies (use of citations and references; choice of paraphrasing, summary, or quoting; using information in ways that are true to original context; distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution) and demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published, confidential and/or proprietary information. 

Quantitative Reasoning

Outcome

Students will be able to apply mathematical concepts to interpret and analyze quantitative data in order to solve a problem or draw a conclusion. 

Dimensions

  • Interpretation: Provides accurate explanations of information presented in mathematical forms. Makes appropriate inferences based on that information. For example, accurately explains the trend data shown in a graph and makes reasonable predictions regarding what the data suggest about future events.
  • Representation: Skillfully converts relevant information into an insightful mathematical portrayal in a way that contributes to a further or deeper understanding
  • Calculation: Calculations attempted are essentially all successful and sufficiently comprehensive to solve the problem. Calculations are also presented elegantly (clearly, concisely, etc.)
  • Application and Analysis: Uses the quantitative analysis of data as the basis for deep and thoughtful judgments, drawing insightful, carefully qualified conclusions from this work.
  • Assumptions: Explicitly describes assumptions and provides compelling rationale for why each assumption is appropriate. Shows awareness that confidence in final conclusions is limited by the accuracy of the assumptions.
  • Communication: Uses quantitative information in connection with the argument or purpose of the work, presents it in an effective format, and explicates it with consistently high quality.

Written Communication

Dimensions

  • Context and Purpose: Demonstrates a thorough understanding of context, audience, and purpose that is responsive to the assigned task(s) and focuses all elements of the work.
  • Content Development: Uses appropriate, relevant, and compelling content to illustrate mastery of the subject, conveying the writer's understanding, and shaping the whole work.
  • Genre and Disciplinary Conventions Demonstrates detailed attention to and successful execution of a wide range of conventions particular to a specific discipline and/or writing task (s) including organization, content, presentation, formatting, and stylistic choices.
  • Sources and Evidence: Demonstrates skillful use of high-quality, credible, relevant sources to develop ideas that are appropriate for the discipline and genre of the writing.
  • Control of Syntax and Mechanics: Uses graceful language that skillfully communicates meaning to readers with clarity and fluency, and is virtually error-free.

Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) Rubrics

"As part of AAC&U's Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) initiative, the Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) rubrics contribute to the national dialogue on assessment of college student learning... Each rubric was developed from the most frequently identified characteristics or criteria of learning for each of the learning outcomes." (Association of American Colleges & Universities VALUE Rubrics)

VALUE Rubrics